First Check Ups

Woofs!
Your puppy would’ve gotten natural immunity from his/her mother. But between 6 to 8 weeks old, that immunity would’ve worn off, leaving him vulnerable to a host of diseases. That’s why his/her shots are started around this time. Vaccination is needed between 6 to 8 weeks, 10 to 12 weeks, and when the puppy reaches his/her 16th week. Generally, puppies get three to four series of vaccines. We can also provide microchipping at this time, followed by annual shots, with additional boosters depending on the puppy’s life. Much like humans, every puppy has his own needs, lifestyle, and environment therefore, the vaccine plan is tailored to the pet’s life. This can be discussed during the appointment. However, even with a personalized vaccination plan, it is important to note that your puppy, like all other puppies, is prone to specific diseases. The core vaccines are designed to stimulate the immune system against infection before exposure to a disease.

These diseases include:
  • Canine distemper: Puppies are most susceptible to this deadly, highly contagious disease. It’s the main reason puppies are vaccinated early.
  • Distemper causes loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and blindness
  • Canine adenovirus: Another fatal, viral disease that causes infectious hepatitis, damaging the puppy’s liver. It spreads in places where large numbers of dogs are in close proximity, like pet shops. A persistent cough is the telltale sign of infection.
  • Canine parvovirus: A highly contagious disease that affects the digestive system, weakens the immune system and damages the heart. It can be lethal in puppies born to unvaccinated mothers. Vaccination is given at 6 to 8 weeks of age.
Non-CORE Vaccines:
  • Rabies: Initial vaccination is given as early as 3 months of age. This however will need to be done at the Agriculture Department.They can be contacted: CI.AgricultureVS@gov.ky
  • Bordetella: Most boarding kennels require that this vaccine be given within 6 months of boarding; the vaccine should be administered at least one week prior to the anticipated boarding date for maximum effect. These bacteria causes respiratory signs such as coughing, nasal discharge, and fever. Serious infections can lead to pneumonia. Dogs in close contact with other dogs such as in dog parks, shelters, boarding and grooming facilities, dog shows, training classes and other high risk environments will benefit from vaccination for this disease. While Bordetella is a major cause of kennel cough, it is important to note that a number of other infectious organisms can cause similar symptoms.
  • Parasite Control Is done at each round of the vaccination visits according to the pets weight
Heartworms
When your puppy is around 12-to-16 weeks, usually around the 3rd or 4th vaccine we will discuss a heartworm preventive. Though there is no vaccine for this condition, it is preventable with regular medication .The name is descriptive — these worms lodge in the right side of the heart and the pulmonary arteries (that send blood to the lungs), though they can travel through the rest of the body and sometimes invade the liver and kidneys. The worms can grow to 14 inches long and, if clumped together, block and injure organs. A new heartworm infection often causes no symptoms, though dogs in later stages of the disease may cough, become lethargic, lose their appetite or have difficulty breathing. Infected dogs may tire after mild exercise. Unlike most of the conditions listed here, which are passed by urine, feces, and other body fluids, heartworms are transmitted by mosquitoes. Therefore, diagnosis is made via a blood test and not a fecal exam.

Meows:
Your Kitten would’ve gotten natural immunity from his/her mother. But between 6 to 8 weeks old, that immunity would’ve worn off, leaving him/her vulnerable to a host of diseases. That’s why his/her shots are started around this time. Vaccination is needed between 6 to 8 weeks, 10 to 12 weeks, and when the kitten reaches his/her 16th week. Generally kittens, get two to three series of vaccines. We can also provide microchipping at this time, followed by annual shots, with additional boosters depending on the kitten’s life. (indoor/outdoor lifestyles.) Much like humans, every kitten has his own needs, lifestyle, and environment therefore, the vaccine plan is tailored to the pet’s life. This can be discussed during the appointment.

Cat Vaccines
  • FVRCP (Also called “the feline distemper vaccine”; which protects against three feline viruses: rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and panleukopenia.)
  • Feline panleukopenia, also known as feline parvovirus, is a highly infectious disease with a high mortality rate in kittens. While the disease usually starts with decreased energy and low appetite, it progresses to vomiting and diarrhea. The virus also kills off the white blood cells, leaving the young ats even more susceptible to secondary infections.
Non-CORE Vaccines?
  • Feline Leukemia vaccine, it is a little more complicated than that. FeLV is found worldwide. Transmitted through body fluids including saliva, urine and feces, FeLV is spread when an infected cat comes into close contact with another cat that they groom or share bowls with. Infection with FeLV is not an automatic death sentence. Many cats are fortunate to go into a regressive state and appear perfectly healthy throughout their lives, but some do not. After a latent period lasting months or even years, the disease progresses to a variety of associated conditions: lymphoma, anemia or immunosuppression resulting in secondary disease. The FeLV vaccine is recommended as core for kittens. The initial vaccination series consists of two doses three to four weeks apart, followed by revaccination one year later for all pet cats.
  • Parasite Control Is done at each round of the vaccination visits according to the pets weight-
  • Again depending on your cat’s lifestyle we may recommend flea and tick prevention such as Revolution.